5 Traditional Christmas Songs from Venezuela to the World

Many are the traditions that we, Venezuelans, have for Christmas time. Delicious foods, decoration, folktales and religious practices are part of our daily routine during the holidays. But none of them compare to the rich musical culture that Venezuela has and which has been considered cultural heritage of Latin America for many years.

Growing up in Venezuela was such a magical journey for me! Ever since I was a young girl, I started discovering a country with such a musical diversity and roots. Musical diversity that has impacted the lives and culture of many Venezuelans in history. Music has been a protest tool, a bridge to unify social classes, a soothing approach to get little children to fall asleep and so on. Music is part of every Venezuelan’s life.

Please don’t forget that Venezuela is a very religious country and that 88% of the population is Christian

This holiday season I would like to share with you my five favorite Christmas songs that as a child, I heard in my birth country, my beloved Venezuela. These songs have a strong connection to the birth of Baby Jesus and the life of Mary and Joseph. Please don’t forget that Venezuela is a very religious country and that 88% of the population is Christian (according to the latest poll 2011). Therefore many of the lyrics are religiously based.

I am going to start with my favorite!

1. El Niño Criollo

This is without a doubt one of Venezuela’s most precious children’s song for Christmas time. It talks about the life of Jesus as a Venezuelan child, describing the different regions of our country and holiday traditions.

Watch the video with your child. The lyrics are also there for you and your family to practice pronunciation and learn new vocabulary.

El Niño Criollo, Venezuelan Christmas song

El Burrito Sabanero

Another beautiful villancico for children and very popular among Latin American nations. Additional to the embedded video I have written the lyrics to make singing in Spanish an easy and effective tool for language learning at home. Who said that we don’t learn also during the holidays?

Con mi burrito sabanero 
voy camino de Belén, 
con mi burrito sabanero 
voy camino de Belén, 


Si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 
si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 

El lucerito mañanero ilumina mi sendero, 
el lucerito mañanero ilumina mi sendero 

Si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 
Si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 

En mi burrito voy cantando, 
mi burrito va trotando, 
En mi burrito voy cantando 
mi burrito va trotando 

Si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 
si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 

tuki tuki tuki tuki, tuki tuki tukitá
da apúrate mi burrito que ya vamos a llegar 

Con mi burrito sabanero 
voy camino de Belén 
con mi burrito sabanero 
voy camino de Belén 

Si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 
si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 

El lucerito mañanero ilumina mi sendero, 
el lucerito mañanero ilumina mi sendero 

Si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 
si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 

En mi burrito voy cantando, 
mi burrito va trotando, 
En mi cuatrico voy cantando 
mi burrito va trotando 

Si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén 
si me ven, si me ven voy camino de Belén

El Burrito Sabanero

Fuego al Cañón

If you are looking for an upbeat song to celebrate Christmas this is it! Fuego al Cañón has easy to learn lyrics that will help your children practice vocabulary in Spanish in no time.

Fuego al cañón
Fuego al cañón
Para que repeten nuestro parrandon (bis)Niño chiquitito
Niño parandero (bis)
Venga con nosotros
Hasta el mes de enero (bis)Fuego al cañón
Fuego al cañón
Para que repeten nuestro parrandon (bis)Esta casa es grande
Tiene cuatro esquinas (bis)
Y en en medio tiene
Rosas y clavelinas (bis)

Fuego al cañón
Fuego al cañón
Para que repeten nuestro parrandon (bis)

Fuego al Cañón, an upbeat song for everyone in the family!

Al Llegar Aquí

When I was in high school, Christmas season was synonym of traditional bazaars and musical presentations where the students made all the arrangements to provide the perfect holiday ambience. I still remember singing Al Llegar Aquí while my two best friends played the drums and the cuatro.

Al llegar aquí,
Me saco el pañuelo
Para darle a todos feliz año nuevo

Palomita blanca,
Paticas azules
Tú eres la que cantas por dentro´e las nubes

Me subí a tres tapias
Pá cogé un laurel
Pasen buenas noches marido y mujer

La Virgen María,
La flor purpurina,
Madre de Jesús allá en Palestina

Esta es la casa
Que yo les decía
Que al llegar a ella la puerta se abría

¿Qué fue del dichoso? ¿Quién? ¡Maravilloso!
Como San José
Que una vara seca la hizo florecer

Esta parrandita,
De nosotros cuatro
Aquí no se meten ni perro ni gato

Dame los pasteles,
Dámelos calientes
Que pasteles fríos avientan la gente

Al Llegar Aquí, traditional Venezuelan Christmas song

Corre Caballito

One of Venezuela’s oldest Christmas songs, Corre Caballito tells the story of a boy riding his little horse on his way to visit the newborn Jesus. It is a song that’s usually sung at church on Christmas Eve mass.

Corre caballito, vamos a Belén
a ver a María y al Niño también;
al Niño también dicen los pastores:
que ha nacido un niño cubierto de flores.

El ángel Gabriel anunció a María
que el Niño Divino de ella nacería.
De ella nacería dicen los pastores:
que ha nacido un niño cubierto de flores.

Los tres Reyes Magos vienen del Oriente
y le traen al Niño hermosos presentes.
Hermosos presentes dicen los pastores:
que ha nacido un niño cubierto de flores.

San José y la Virgen, la mula y el buey
fueron los que vieron al Niño nacer.
Al Niño nacer dicen los pastores :
que ha nacido un Niño cubierto de flores.

Corre Caballito, an old song with a lot of significance to Venezuelans

What are you waiting for? Start playing these songs around the house now!

I promise you these traditional Venezuelan carols will make your holidays season more fun, cheerful, and full of Latin American rhythm.

¡Feliz Navidad!

Published by Little Nómadas

Mother, foreign languages educator, expat, intercultural relations coach, and travel addict.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: